Street Sweeping Begins in Minneapolis-Will Last 4 Weeks

Fall is in full swing, and that means crews are preparing to sweep streets across Minneapolis. Drivers will need to park out of their way so they can do a thorough job cleaning our roadways.

Minneapolis Public Works will begin the big task of curb-to-curb sweeping and leaf collection on streets throughout the city on Tuesday, Oct. 20. During the four weeks of the comprehensive fall street sweep, crews will clean up about 1,100 miles of city streets. To make sure the sweepers can do the best job possible, temporary “No Parking” signs will be posted at least 24 hours in advance so streets will be clear of cars when they’re swept. The first signs will be posted Monday, Oct. 19, and sweeping will begin the next day. Anyone who parks on the street will need to follow street sweep parking rules or their cars may be ticketed and towed.

Making it easy to follow parking rules:

  • “No Parking” signs – City crews will post “No Parking” signs at least 24 hours before sweeping any streets. Parking will be banned from 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on the day a street is swept. The “No Parking” signs will be removed as soon as possible after a street has been completely swept to allow people to resume parking. Vehicles not in compliance with “No Parking” signs may be ticketed and towed to the Minneapolis Impound Lot.
  • Social media – The City will use Facebook and Twitter to post periodic street sweeping updates and information.
  • Phone calls to residents – In addition to the “No Parking” signs that will be posted the day before sweepers come through, the City will make about 3,000 automated phone calls each evening to let residents know their street will be swept the next day.  There’s no guarantee that the calls will reach everyone, so residents should be sure to check the schedule and watch for signs.
  • Interactive web feature – Folks can use a feature on the City’s website to find out when the sweepers are coming through their neighborhoods. The tool will be available at www.minneapolismn.gov/streetsweeping. The fall street sweep takes four weeks, and visitors to the website will be able to find out which week their street is scheduled to be swept. Then, on the weekend before each of the four weeks, the schedule for the upcoming week will be broken down to show which day of the week streets are scheduled to be swept.
  • Videos – Street sweeping is explained in English, Hmong, Somali and Spanish as part of the City’s  “Did you know…” series of short videos that can be viewed atwww.YouTube.com/cityofminneapolis and on City cable channels 14 and 79. Residents who have friends or neighbors who speak these languages are encouraged to share links to the videos.
    • English: See how and why Minneapolis sweeps streets and what you can do to help keep streets and waterways clean in this video from the Minneapolis “Did you know…” series.
    • Spanish:  Vea en este video de las series “Sabia Usted” como y porque Minneapolis barre las calles y limpia las vias fluviales.
    • Somali: Ka daawo fiidyowga taxanaha… ee Minneapolis ee loo yaqaan “Ma Ogtahay” siyaabaha iyo sababaha minneapolis jidadka ay u xaaqido oo ogow sidii aad uga caawin lahayd ilaalinta nadaafada jidadka iyo biyo mareenada.
    • Hmong: Yog xav paub ntxiv, sais nroog Minneapolis cov tshooj xov xwm hu, “Koj pos paub.”

Clean streets mean a healthier environment

Minneapolis is known for its sparkling lakes and waterways, and we want to keep it that way. That’s why focusing on the well-being of our environment is one of the City’s top priorities. Street sweeping is one way we work to protect our environment because it keeps leaves and debris from clogging our storm drains and polluting our lakes and rivers. It also helps keep our neighborhoods clean and livable.

Minneapolis streets are swept completely curb to curb once in the spring and once in the fall. Residents should not push leaves, grass clippings, or other debris into City streets – it’s bad for our lakes and waterways, can cause safety hazards, and is against the law. Anything that goes down a storm drain flows directly into our lakes and river, and decomposing plant material in the water encourages the growth of harmful aquatic plants and algae.

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